Sunday, August 28, 2016

Slow Pizza U.S.A.


Two days to make the sourdough dough . . .

One hour to roast and puree the tomato sauce . . .

Twenty minutes to grate the mozzarella cheese* and slice mushrooms and bell peppers . . .

And finally . . .


Half-eaten pepperoni.


Half-eaten bell pepper and mushroom.

It's a long way from Papa John's delivery, but worth the wait for sure.

* At least I wasn't making my own mozzarella and pepperoni. Though I don't rule out any crazy kitchen preparations anymore.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Looks wonderful! Mary in MN

Joellen said...

That looks delicious! I love pizza. I hope y'all are settling into your new home and all is well.

tu mere said...

A. must not be home. Can't believe there would be that much left over otherwise. Yum!

Zoe said...

Looks delicious!
Were you able to keep your sourdough alive and happy in the colder months at Blackrock?
As a cold home dweller, I keep putting off sourdough, thinking I won't be able to keep it as my kombucha goes dormant over winter and just moulds instead of ferments if i try.

Kristin @ Going Country said...

Zoe: I never did the baking before moving here, but I don't remember the MiL having too much trouble in the winter. She always kept the starter jar in the refrigerator, anyway, and when she was actually making the bread, she would put the bowls on top of the mantle over the woodstove to rise, I think. Sourdough is pretty hardy. It just takes longer to "work" and rise when it's colder.

Anonymous said...

For Zoe--
Summer is actually harder for our native strain of sourdough, which A. started via the open air and water and flour method; that is, he used no yeast to initiate the sourdough. I do remember my cousin remarking that once she had a strain of sourdough that seemed to be quite sensitive to temperature, so that can happen. I actually have more trouble in the summer than in the winter. Sometimes the rises are so fast in the summer that my bowl overflows. In the summer, I find that I truly need to do the final rise (of the shaped loaves) in the fridge. Sometimes I can do the final rise out of the fridge during the winter.
MIL